Couple finds dog six miles away after being missing for over a year

by: Becca J. G. Godwin, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Updated: May 16, 2017 – 4:08 PM

ATLANTA – George, a black shepherd-lab mix with a white chest and brindle paws, slipped his leash and took off during a walk with a dog sitter on Christmas 2015 in Atlanta.

Owners Julianne Green and Matt Furniss were informed of the news while visiting New York for the holidays. Devastated, they cut their trip short so they could begin searching. 

>> Read more trending news

Nearly 17 months later, they can finally stop. 

A microchip company called the couple last week to tell them George had been picked up in Atlanta’s Oakland City neighborhood — about six miles from their Reynoldstown neighborhood — and was scanned in at Fulton County Animal Services. 

They raced to the shelter. Green was expecting George to be sick, injured or aggressive. But then they saw him.

“He came right up to us and was so lovey and happy,” she said Tuesday. “And it was like he wasn’t gone for one and a half years.”

Green and Furniss were thrilled, but so were hundreds of others. 

George had gained a following since the couple posted about his disappearance on Nextdoor in December 2015. Many missing-animal posts are on the online forum, but George was a special case. Neighbors helped put up flyers, checked in and posted any time there was a suspected sighting. 

Eventually, the sightings slowed. A naysayer on Nextdoor said the dog couldn’t have survived the winter and advised people to stop posting about him. The couple donated George’s belongings, but remained hopeful. 

Green thinks people became invested in George’s story because he went missing on Christmas and because he kept darting between neighborhoods. Despite the occasional sightings, the then-2-year-old dog was skittish and didn’t recognize his name being called. 

The couple — who adopted George from the Humane Society in Atlanta after a bad flood hit South Carolina — had only owned him for two months.

When Green shared the news that George had been found to Nextdoor, the post got more than 230 “thanks” and more than 100 comments in less than a week.

Since his return, the couple has since found out their dog is heartworm positive, and have started a GoFundMe to raise money for George’s treatment. Over $1,000 has been raised toward its $3,000 goal.

“He has become a local celebrity,” the fundraising page says. “Chances are when we meet a new neighbor, they have already heard a piece of his journey.” 

The couple said they’re “eternally grateful” for the neighborhood’s support.

Any extra funds from the campaign will be donated to Fulton County Animal Services in George’s name.

Inmate who lived upstanding life after he was mistakenly freed wins release

Story highlights

  • Rene Lima-Marin was released improperly in 2008 and rearrested in 2014
  • During the years he was free, he found a job, got married, started raising a family, and purchased a home, said his attorney Kimberly Diego

(CNN)A Colorado man who was sent back to prison after being mistakenly released was told by a judge Tuesday that he is a free man.

Rene Lima-Marin was serving a 98-year prison term for robbing two video stores in 1998. He was released, improperly, in 2008, but was rearrested in 2014, when authorities realized the mistake. In a 165-page decision, Arapahoe County District Court Judge Carlos Samour Jr. said “it would be utterly unjust to compel Lima-Marin, at this juncture, to serve the rest of his extremely long sentence”

In the six years that Lima-Miran was free, he found a job, got married, started raising a family, and purchased a home, said his attorney Kimberly Diego. “His case was unique in that sense,” she said. “Not all people who are rehabilitated behave that way.”

    Lima-Marin was called an “asset to society” and an “outstanding citizen” who worked with young people encouraging them to make good decisions, per the judge’s ruling.

    The mix-up for the father of two boiled down to an error in paperwork that said Lima-Miran’s sentences were to be served concurrently, instead of consecutively.

    Based on the paperwork, an attorney, who met with Lima-Marin in prison to discuss an appeal, told him that his sentence had been reduced to 16 years. The attorney advised him to forgo the appeal and instead wait to be released on parole in 2008.

    Lima-Miran’s absence from prison wasn’t noticed until January 7, 2014, when a former prosecutor searched for his name on the DOC’s inmate locator website and couldn’t find it. Lima-Marin was arrested by 11:00 p.m. that same day in front of his family, according to Samour’s report, in order to serve the remainder of his 98-year sentence.

    “In effect, after its utter lack of care led to Lima-Marin’s premature release and prolonged erroneous liberty, in January 2014 the government decided to compensate for its transgressions by swiftly turning back the clock and returning Lima-Marin to prison — not through the use of a magic wand or the invention of a time machine built out of a DeLorean, which might have transported him back to his life in April 2008, but through the simple issuance of an arrest warrant, which merely put him back in prison, disregarding everything that had transpired between April 2008 and January 2014,” said Samour.

    Lima-Marin started his prison term in April 2000, after being found guilty of multiple counts of kidnapping, burglary, aggravated robbery, and — because a gun was used in the break-ins — use of a deadly weapon during commission of a crime. No shots were fired and no one was injured in the robberies, per the judge’s document.

    Another person, Michael Clifton, was also convicted of the robberies.

    In the judge’s decision, Lima-Miran was called a model prisoner who completed five years of parole with flying colors. Samour later adds that the government acted with “conscience-shocking” indifference in re-incarcerating Lima-Marin in 2014.

    “Requiring Lima-Marin to serve the rest of his prison sentence all these years later would be draconian, would deprive him of substantive due process, and would perpetrate a manifest injustice. Because the Court finds that Lima-Marin is being unlawfully detained, he is ordered released. No other remedy will result in justice in this case,” the judge said.

    Lima-Marin is currently being held at the Fremont Correctional Facility in Canon City, Colorado, said his attorney. He could be released in the next day or two. The court is required to send the order terminating the sentencing to the Department of Correction prior to his release.

    “This is a really uplifting case,” said Diego. “The judge was very thorough, took a lot of time and gave this case a lot of attention. You can tell he wanted to make sure this was perfect. We are thankful that he took the time that he did.”

    The Colorado Attorney General’s office is currently reviewing the decision, according to spokesperson Annie Skinner.

    Meet the Woman Responsible for Rescuing Hundreds of Dogs From ‘Dumping Site’ Over 7 Years

    Headlines

    Meet the Woman Responsible for Rescuing Hundreds of Dogs From ‘Dumping Site’ Over 7 Years

    Playing

    Meet the Woman Responsible for Rescuing Hundreds of Dogs From ‘Dumping Site’ Over 7 Years

    Judy Obregon, of Texas, never expected that saving one stray dog would lead to years of dog rescues.


    Obregon, 44, rescued her first dog from a local Texas “dumping ground” near Echo Lake in Fort Worth nearly seven years ago.

    “I was driving down the service road [near the lake] and I spotted a stray. The stray led me to another dog that was injured,” Obregon told InsideEdition.com.

    Obregon spent the next week gaining the dog’s trust and feeding it daily until it finally decided to come with her. She was able to rescue the dog, which later healed and was adopted.

    “Other people in the area started coming up to me [during that week] about other dogs that they’d seen. They gave me locations of dogs that had been dumped,” Obregon said.

    She said she began finding tons of dead dogs in the area and so her journey of dog rescues began.

    She was then inspired to start, “The Abandoned Ones Animal Rescue,” a rescue organization that rescues dogs and then aspires to find them loving homes. 

    Since then, Obregon has rescued more than 300 dogs, she said.

    Just last month, Obregon found Callie at the “dumping site” with a rope around her neck. She had escaped the fence she had been tied to and could barely walk, Obregon said. 

    “She walks up to me and puts her head in between my legs,” Obregon said. 

    In a video Obregon shared of Callie’s rescue, the pup takes one look back at where she was rescued from while Obregon is driving away and then kisses her rescuer.

    Callie is currently living with a foster family and is doing much better.

    Obregon said some of the abuse cases she’s seen have been horrific.

    In 2016, Obregon rescued a dog named Mercy, who she initially thought was dead when she saw her in her rearview mirror while driving along a deserted road.

    “When I saw her lift her head, I turned around immediately. She was dragging both of her back legs. She just wagged and wagged despite the condition that I found her in,” Obregon said. “I think every animal I find out there. It’s almost like they are waiting for me.”

    Mercy had multiple leg fractures and the vet initially said she may not walk again. She was in a wheelchair for the first months of her recovery, but the courageous pup ended up healing. She has since been adopted.

    Sadly, Obregon said she finds a lot more dogs dead than living. 

    “There are times I don’t even sleep when I find them dead. I found one recently dead last week that truly broke my heart. It was a tiny puppy that was found inside a bag. Someone had cut the dog’s chest open. It’s the worst case I’ve seen recently,” Obregon said.

    She said that it’s moments like that when she is encouraged to continue what she’s doing.

    Obregon’s motto for her organization is that “every animal matters.”

    “It’s not just about rescuing,” Obregon said. “It’s about educating people to avoid these circumstances. I don’t think I can stop until I make a change in the area or make a big impact.”

    Receive Breaking News

    By signing up, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

    Your e-mail was submitted successfully.

    Sorry, your email address was not processed. Please try again.

    Around the Web



    Comments

    100% renewable milestone

    Since 2012, the LEGO Group has supported the development of more than 160 megawatts of renewable energy. The latest investment is a 25% stake in the Burbo Bank Extension wind farm off the coast of Liverpool, UK. The wind farm, which was officially opened today, will generate clean power for more than 230,000 British households.

    “We work to leave a positive impact on the planet and I am truly excited about the inauguration of the Burbo Bank Extension wind farm. This development means we have now reached the 100% renewable energy milestone three years ahead of target. Together with our partners, we intend to continue investing in renewable energy to help create a better future for the builders of tomorrow,” said Bali Padda, CEO of the LEGO Group.

    Image caption: The Burbo Bank Extension wind farm is a joint venture between DONG Energy (50%) and its partners PKA (25%) and KIRKBI A/S (25%), parent company of the LEGO Group. © DONG Energy A/S.

    The total ouput from the investments by the LEGO Group in renewables now exceeds the energy consumed at all LEGO factories, stores and offices globally. In 2016, more than 360 gigawatt hours of energy were used by the LEGO Group to produce the more than 75 billion LEGO bricks sold around the world during the year.

    Reaching the 100% renewable milestone was a target inspired by the LEGO Group’s partnership with the WWF Climate Savers programme. The LEGO Group works with other partners to advocate for investment in renewable energy and has joined the RE100, a global initiative of companies committed to using 100% renewable energy. 

    Involving and inspiring children 
    To raise awareness of the importance of renewable energy, the LEGO Group has built the world’s largest LEGO® brick wind turbine, a Guinness World Records™ title. Built with 146,000 LEGO bricks, the wind turbine stands 7.5 metres tall and is a tribute to the record 200 metre tall wind turbines of the Burbo Bank Extension wind farm – the largest windmills in operation globally. From the summer of 2017 the LEGO wind turbine will be located at the LEGOLAND Windsor Resort, in the UK. 

    To inspire children to engage in environmental issues, the LEGO Group has invited hundreds of children from the Liverpool area and more than a million children on the LEGO Life social media platform to participate in building challenges. Children are encouraged to use their creativity and imagination to build a renewable energy machine that can capture the wind and provide energy to power their lives. 

    “We see children as our role models and as we take action in reducing our environmental impact as a company, we will also continue to work to inspire children around the world by engaging them in environmental and social issues,” said Bali Padda.

    As a part of the activities, children across the world can also join the LEGO Planet Crew on LEGO.com, where they can take part in a mission to help protect the planet for future generations and share their views on the responsibility issues they feel most passionate about. 

    Further information:
    Roar Rude Trangbæk 
    Senior Media Relations Manager
    E-mail: [email protected]
    Ph: +45 79504348

    Matthew Whitby
    Communication Manager
    E-mail: [email protected]
    Ph: +45 795025351

    Facts about Burbo Bank Extension

    • The Burbo Bank Extension wind farm is a joint venture between DONG Energy (50%) and its partners PKA (25%) and KIRKBI A/S (25%), parent company of the LEGO Group. 
    • The wind farm is located 7 kilometres off the coast of Liverpool and has a capacity of 258 megawatts, enough to supply renewable energy to 230,000 British households.
    • The wind farm consists of 32 MHI Vestas V164-8.0 MW wind turbines.
    • KIRKBI A/S invested approximately DKK 3.3 billion (GBP 375 million) in the construction of the wind farm, bringing the total amount invested in building offshore wind power to over DKK 6 billion (GBP 680 million).

    Facts about the LEGO Group’s 100% renewable energy milestone

    • Since 2012, KIRKBI A/S has invested approximately DKK 6 billion in renewable energy on behalf of the LEGO Group, equivalent to 162 megawatts.
    • In addition to Burbo Bank Extension, KIRKBI A/S owns 31.5% of the Borkum Riffgrund 1 offshore wind farm in Germany, which can produce 312 megawatts and provide clean energy for 320,000 households.
    • 20,000 solar panels will be installed on the roof of the LEGO® factory in Jiaxing, China. The panels will produce almost six gigawatts of energy per year. This is equivalent to the electricity use of more than 6,000 Chinese households. 

    Inmate who lived upstanding life after he was mistakenly freed wins release

    Story highlights

    • Rene Lima-Marin was released improperly in 2008 and rearrested in 2014
    • During the years he was free, he found a job, got married, started raising a family, and purchased a home, said his attorney Kimberly Diego

    (CNN)A Colorado man who was sent back to prison after being mistakenly released was told by a judge Tuesday that he is a free man.

    Rene Lima-Marin was serving a 98-year prison term for robbing two video stores in 1998. He was released, improperly, in 2008, but was rearrested in 2014, when authorities realized the mistake. In a 165-page decision, Arapahoe County District Court Judge Carlos Samour Jr. said “it would be utterly unjust to compel Lima-Marin, at this juncture, to serve the rest of his extremely long sentence”

      In the six years that Lima-Miran was free, he found a job, got married, started raising a family, and purchased a home, said his attorney Kimberly Diego. “His case was unique in that sense,” she said. “Not all people who are rehabilitated behave that way.”

      Lima-Marin was called an “asset to society” and an “outstanding citizen” who worked with young people encouraging them to make good decisions, per the judge’s ruling.

      The mix-up for the father of two boiled down to an error in paperwork that said Lima-Miran’s sentences were to be served concurrently, instead of consecutively.

      Based on the paperwork, an attorney, who met with Lima-Marin in prison to discuss an appeal, told him that his sentence had been reduced to 16 years. The attorney advised him to forgo the appeal and instead wait to be released on parole in 2008.

      Lima-Miran’s absence from prison wasn’t noticed until January 7, 2014, when a former prosecutor searched for his name on the DOC’s inmate locator website and couldn’t find it. Lima-Marin was arrested by 11:00 p.m. that same day in front of his family, according to Samour’s report, in order to serve the remainder of his 98-year sentence.

      “In effect, after its utter lack of care led to Lima-Marin’s premature release and prolonged erroneous liberty, in January 2014 the government decided to compensate for its transgressions by swiftly turning back the clock and returning Lima-Marin to prison — not through the use of a magic wand or the invention of a time machine built out of a DeLorean, which might have transported him back to his life in April 2008, but through the simple issuance of an arrest warrant, which merely put him back in prison, disregarding everything that had transpired between April 2008 and January 2014,” said Samour.

      Lima-Marin started his prison term in April 2000, after being found guilty of multiple counts of kidnapping, burglary, aggravated robbery, and — because a gun was used in the break-ins — use of a deadly weapon during commission of a crime. No shots were fired and no one was injured in the robberies, per the judge’s document.

      Another person, Michael Clifton, was also convicted of the robberies.

      In the judge’s decision, Lima-Miran was called a model prisoner who completed five years of parole with flying colors. Samour later adds that the government acted with “conscience-shocking” indifference in re-incarcerating Lima-Marin in 2014.

      “Requiring Lima-Marin to serve the rest of his prison sentence all these years later would be draconian, would deprive him of substantive due process, and would perpetrate a manifest injustice. Because the Court finds that Lima-Marin is being unlawfully detained, he is ordered released. No other remedy will result in justice in this case,” the judge said.

      Lima-Marin is currently being held at the Fremont Correctional Facility in Canon City, Colorado, said his attorney. He could be released in the next day or two. The court is required to send the order terminating the sentencing to the Department of Correction prior to his release.

      “This is a really uplifting case,” said Diego. “The judge was very thorough, took a lot of time and gave this case a lot of attention. You can tell he wanted to make sure this was perfect. We are thankful that he took the time that he did.”

      The Colorado Attorney General’s office is currently reviewing the decision, according to spokesperson Annie Skinner.

      Canada makes it illegal to remove passengers from overbooked planes

      New passenger bill of rights comes after man was dragged off United Airlines flight in Chicago

      No one who has bought a ticket for a domestic or international flight in Canada will be allowed to be removed because of overbooking, the transportation minister has announced, unveiling a new passenger bill of rights.

      Marc Garneau said the shoddy treatment of air passengers outlined in recent news reports would not be tolerated on any domestic flight as well as any flight leaving or arriving in Canada.

      United passenger dragged off plane likely to sue airline, attorney says

      He says said the rules would ensure “travellers are treated like people and not numbers”.

      The new regulation comes a month after cellphone video captured a passenger being dragged off a United Airlines flight in Chicago after he refused to leave his seat to accommodate airline crew members.

      Garneau said if airlines could not get a volunteer with a minimum level of compensation they would have to increase the amount offered.

      “When Canadians buy an airline ticket they expect the airline to keep its part of the deal,” he said.

      Minimum compensation standards would also be set for damaged baggage.

      The regulations would additionally increase the cap on foreign ownership of airlines from 25% to 49%.

      The government hopes to have the new regulations in place in 2018.

      India cancelling huge coal power station because it wants to focus on renewable energy

      • 1/56

        16 May 2017

        France’s newly appointed Prime Minister Edouard Philippe walks out his home in Paris, before going to the Hotel Matignon

        Getty Images

      • 2/56

        15 May 2017

        An investigator works near wreckage at the site where a Learjet 35 crashed in Carlstadt, New Jersey

        Reuters

      • 3/56

        15 May 2017

        Ahmad Khan Rahimi, an Afghan-born US citizen accused of planting bombs in New York and New Jersey, appears with Deputy Public Defender Peter Liguori in Union County Superior Court for a hearing in Elizabeth, New Jersey

        Reuters

      • 4/56

        15 May 2017

        Ahmad Khan Rahimi, an Afghan-born US citizen accused of planting bombs in New York and New Jersey, appears in Union County Superior Court for a hearing in Elizabeth, New Jersey

        Reuters

      • 5/56

        15 May 2017

        National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster speaks to members of the media outside the West Wing of the White Hous

        AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

      • 6/56

        15 May 2017

        A television plays a news report on US President Donald Trump’s recent Oval Office meeting with Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov as night falls on offices and the entrance of the West Wing White House in Washington

        Reuters

      • 7/56

        15 May 2017

        German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures to French President Emmanuel Macron after addressing a press conference at the chancellery in Berlin

        Getty Images

      • 8/56

        11 May 2017

        The Borobudur temple seen illuminated during celebrations for Vesak Day in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia

        Getty Images

      • 9/56

        11 May 2017

        Buddhist followers walk around the Borobudur temple during Pradaksina procession as a part of celebrations for Vesak Day in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia

        Getty Images

      • 10/56

        10 May 2017

        Riot security forces clash with demonstrators during a protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in San Cristobal, Venezuela

        Reuters

      • 11/56

        10 May 2017

        Protesters denounce the firing of FBI Director James Comey by US President Donald Trump amid investigations into possible collusion between Trump advisors and the Russian government

        Getty Images

      • 12/56

        10 May 2017

        Protesters outside a federal building in Los Angeles, California denounce the firing of FBI Director James Comey by US President Donald Trump

        Getty Images

      • 13/56

        10 May 2017

        Isabel Cardenas holds a sign in Los Angeles, California as protestors denounce the firing of FBI Director James Comey by US President Donald Trump amid investigations into possible collusion between Trump advisors and the Russian government

        Getty Images

      • 14/56

        10 May 2017

        Protesters on an overpass above the 101 freeway denounce the firing of FBI Director James Comey by US President Donald Trump amid investigations into possible collusion between Trump advisors and the Russian government in Los Angeles, California

        Getty Images

      • 15/56

        10 May 2017

        Protesters on an overpass above the 101 freeway denounce the firing of FBI Director James Comey by US President Donald Trump amid investigations into possible collusion between Trump advisors and the Russian government in Los Angeles, California

        Getty Images

      • 16/56

        10 May 2017

        Volunteers carry water for the displaced as Iraqi forces battle with Islamic State militants, in western Mosul, Iraq

        Reuters

      • 17/56

        10 May 2017

        Alibaba employees attend a mass wedding at their headquarters in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province

        Reuters

      • 18/56

        10 May 2017

        Alibaba Chief Executive Officer Daniel Zhang and employees attend a mass wedding at their headquarters in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province

        Reuters

      • 19/56

        10 May 2017

        Indian villagers and forestry workers gather around the carcass of an elephant as it lies near railway tracks after being struck by a passenger train at Kiranchandra Tea Garden, some 30kms, from Siliguri

        Getty Images

      • 20/56

        9 May 2017

        A woman and a girl run away as riot security forces and demonstrators clash during a protest against Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Tariba, Venezuela

        Reuters

      • 21/56

        9 May 2017

        Riot security forces clash with demonstrators during a protest against Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Tariba, Venezuela

        Reuters

      • 22/56

        9 May 2017

        Protestors linked to streets movements install an inflatable figure resembling former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva dressed as a prisoner in front of the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, Brazil

        EPA

      • 23/56

        9 May 2017

        Messages are seen on plastic containers filled with faeces, called ‘Poopootovs’, which is a play on Molotov cocktails, before they are thrown at security forces during protests, in addition to the usual rocks and petrol bombs, in Caracas, Venezuela. The messages read, ‘Freedom’, ‘Free Venezuela’, ‘For the future’, ‘For Venezuela’, ‘This is you’, ‘For the political prisoners’, ‘Murderers’, ‘GNB you are this’ and ‘For our children’

        Reuters

      • 24/56

        9 May 2017

        Alan Ruschel and Helio Neto, Chapocoense survivors of the air crash in Colombia last November, visit the spot of the accident near La Union, Colombia

        Getty Images

      • 25/56

        9 May 2017

        Allan Ruschel, a Brazilian player who survived the air crash in which most of the Chapocoense football team died in Colombia last November, hugs the firewoman who helped him on the night of the accident, at la Union, Antioquia

        Getty Images

      • 26/56

        9 May 2017

        Alan Ruschel, Chapocoense survivor of the air crash in Colombia last November, in La Union, Colombia, for their final match against Colombian team Atletico Nacional for the Recopa Sudamericana

        Getty Images

      • 27/56

        9 May 2017

        Family and friends mourn the death of their loved ones during the massive wake in San Isidro Chilchotla, Puebla state, Mexico

        Getty Images

      • 28/56

        9 May 2017

        US former President Barack Obama is silhouetted as he leaves the stage at the end of his speech during the third edition of ‘Seed & Chips: The Global Food Innovation Summit’ focussing on new technologies for feeding the globe, from agriculture to distribution in Milan

        Getty Images

      • 29/56

        9 May 2017

        A protestor holds stones to throw at police forces during a violent service delivery protest in Ennerdale, Johannesburg, South Africa

        EPA

      • 30/56

        9 May 2017

        Police forces shoot at protestors during a violent service delivery protest in Ennerdale, Johannesburg, South Africa

        EPA

      • 31/56

        9 May 2017

        Protestors stand by burning barricades during a violent service delivery protest in Ennerdale, Johannesburg, South Africa

        EPA

      • 32/56

        9 May 2017

        Russian servicemen march at Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in Moscow

        Getty Images

      • 33/56

        9 May 2017

        Russian servicewomen march at Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in Moscow

        Getty Images

      • 34/56

        8 May 2017

        A demonstrator performs on a violin during a protest in Caracas, Venezuela

        EPA

      • 35/56

        8 May 2017

        A Venezuelan opposition demonstrator waves a flag at the riot police in a clash during a protest against President Nicolas Maduro, in Caraca

        Getty Images

      • 36/56

        8 May 2017

        Demonstrators help another protestor during clashes with members of the National Bolivarian Guard (GNB) in Caracas, Venezuela

        EPA

      • 37/56

        8 May 2017

        Canada geese (Branta canadensis) swin floodwaters near a house in St-Eustache, Quebec, Canada

        EPA

      • 38/56

        8 May 2017

        Members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) bring sand bags to protect the library and the city hall by floodwaters in Oka, Quebec, Canada

        EPA

      • 39/56

        8 May 2017

        Outgoing French President Francois Hollande touches the arm of French president-elect Emmanuel Macron, during a ceremony to mark Victory Day in Paris

        AP

      • 40/56

        8 May 2017

        Ceremonial troops prepare for a ceremony to mark Victory Day in Paris, France. French president-elect Emmanuel Macron, will appear Monday alongside current President Francois Hollande in commemoration of the end of World War II

        AP

      • 41/56

        8 May 2017

        Reza Parastesh, a doppelganger of Barcelona and Argentina’s footballer Lionel Messi, poses for a picture with fans in a street in Tehran, Iran

        AFP/Getty Images

      • 42/56

        8 May 2017

        French riot police face off with demonstrators the day after the country went to the polls, in Paris

        Reuters

      • 43/56

        7 May 2017

        Outgoing French President Francois Hollande looks out of a window, next to the last survivor of the 1944 Tulle massacre Jean Viacroze, as he visits polling stations after casting his ballot in Tulle, central France

        Getty Images

      • 44/56

        7 May 2017

        Former US President Barack Obama speaks after receiving the 2017 Profile in Courage Award during a ceremony at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, Massachusetts

        Reuters

      • 45/56

        7 May 2017

        Former President Barack Obama, right, is presented with the 2017 Profile in Courage award by former US Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy, during ceremonies at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, in Boston

        AP

      • 46/56

        2 May 2017

        Mount Sinabung volcano spews thick volcanic ash as seen from Beganding village in Karo

        Getty Images

      • 47/56

        2 May 2017

        A member of the Syrian civil defence, known as The White Helmets, teaches schoolchildren how to protect themselves in case of an air strike during a war safety awareness campaign conducted by the group in the rebel-held area of Harasta, on the northeastern outskirts of the capital Damascus

        Getty Images

      • 48/56

        2 May 2017

        Russian President Vladimir Putin greets German Chancellor Angela Merkel prior to their talks at the Bocharov Ruchei state residence in Sochi, Russia

        Reuters

      • 49/56

        2 May 2017

        Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Bocharov Ruchei state residence in Sochi, Russia

        Reuters

      • 50/56

        2 May 2017

        Israeli children look through binoculars during a display of Israeli Defense Forces equipment and abilities, as part of the celebrations for Israel’s Independence Day marking the 69th anniversary, in the southern city of Sderot, Israel

        Reuters

      • 51/56

        2 May 2017

        An Israeli girl plays with a rifle during a display of Israeli Defense Forces equipment and abilities, as part of the celebrations for Israel’s Independence Day marking the 69th anniversary, in the southern city of Sderot, Israel

        Reuters

      • 52/56

        1 May 2017

        Police block the street as smoke pours into the air following a series of loud blasts were heard in Toronto

        The Canadian Press via AP

      • 53/56

        1 May 2017

        A Bolivarian National Guard water cannon puts out a gasoline bomb that fell on an armored vehicle during an opposition May Day march in Caracas, Venezuela

        AP

      • 54/56

        1 May 2017

        An opposition activist clashes with the police during a march against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro held on May Day, in Caracas

        Getty Images

      • 55/56

        1 May 2017

        Venezuelan opposition activists protect themselves and prepare to confront a water cannon, during clashes with police within a march against President Nicolas Maduro, held on May Day in Caracas

        Getty Images

      • 56/56

        1 May 2017

        Venezuelan opposition activists clash with riot police as they demonstrate against President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas

        Getty Images

      The 22-year-old Brit who stopped the global cyberattack is donating his $10,000 reward to charity

      LONDON — The 22-year-old Brit who “accidentally” halted Friday’s
      devastating global cyberattack says he plans to give his $10,000
      (£7,700) reward to charity.

      “I don’t do what I do for money or fame,” he told Business
      Insider. “I’d rather give the money to people who need it.”

      Late last week, a ransomware attack that used a leaked National
      Security Agency “EternalBlue” software exploit
      spread rapidly around the world, infecting organisations in
      more than 150 countries,
      including Britain’s National Health Service, the Spanish
      telecommunications giant Telefonica, Nissan, and FedEx.

      But the “WannaCry” malware’s spread was halted when a
      pseudonymous British security researcher who goes by MalwareTech

      registered a website he found when investigating the
      malware’s code. In doing so, he inadvertently triggered a “kill
      switch” — and he continued to host the website when he realised
      what he had done.

      Since then, he has been inundated with unwanted publicity, with
      journalists tracking down his real name, publishing his photo,
      and appearing outside his home, where he lives with his parents.

      “If you turn up at my house you’re crossed off the list of
      potential media outlets I will do an exclusive with,” he
      tweeted on Monday. “For the record I don’t ‘fear for my
      safety,’ I’m just unhappy with trying to help clear up Friday’s
      mess with the doorbell going constantly.”

      He has now been offered a $10,000 reward — but he says he doesn’t
      want it.

      HackerOne is a platform that lets security professionals
      responsibly report potential security issues in software, often
      in return for a cash reward, a so-called bug bounty. In
      recognition of MalwareTech’s efforts, the company publicly offered him the
      $10,000 bounty, writing, “Thank you for your active research
      into this malware and for making the internet safer!”

      He responded that he would donate it to charity.

      “I plan on holding a vote to decided which charities will get the
      majority of the money,” he wrote. “The rest will go to buying
      books/resources for people looking to get into [information
      security] who can’t afford them.”

      In a message, MalwareTech told Business Insider he hadn’t decided
      the sort of charities he would give the reward to, and that he
      planned “to let people suggest which they think is best.”

      So why does he do what he does? “Because it helps people, and I
      enjoy it,” he said.

      The vulnerability in Microsoft Windows that WannaCry exploited
      was patched in March, but because many organisations hadn’t
      updated their software, they remained vulnerable.

      On Monday, Microsoft published a blog post
      excoriating the NSA for “stockpiling” software exploits and
      for the subsequent leak of those exploits online by the hacking
      group Shadow Brokers.

      “An equivalent scenario with conventional weapons would be the US
      military having some of its Tomahawk missiles stolen,” wrote
      Microsoft’s president, Brad Smith. “The governments of the world
      should treat this attack as a wake-up call.”

      MalwareTech has since been offered another reward for his work —
      a year’s worth of free pizza,
      courtesy of the food delivery firm Just Eat.

      “Yeah, I’ll probably claim it,” he said. “I do like delivered
      food, and it would be perfect for con after-parties.”

      Uber engineer barred from work on key self-driving technology, judge says

      Uber engineer Anthony Levandowski will be restricted from working on a critcal component of the company’s self-driving car technology, a judge ruled Monday.

      SAN FRANCISCO — Uber sidestepped a full shutdown of its self-driving car efforts Monday when a federal judge stopped short of issuing a temporary injunction against the ride-hailing company’s autonomous vehicle program.

      But the court mandated that Anthony Levandowski, a star engineer leading Uber’s self-driving car program, must be restricted from working on a critical component of autonomous vehicle technology throughout the duration of the litigation, a setback that could hamper the company’s development efforts.

      Advertisement

      The decision came in a case that has underlined the increasingly bitter fight between Uber and Waymo, the self-driving car business that operates under Google’s parent company. Both companies have been striving to race ahead of each other in autonomous vehicles, which many consider to be the future of transportation. The outcome could affect who wins or loses in the technology, which has also drawn in other tech companies, automakers, and startups.

      The case began in February, when Waymo filed a lawsuit against Uber, accusing it of stealing trade secrets to develop self-driving cars. Waymo said the thief was Levandowski, a onetime star engineer at Google and a guru of autonomous vehicle technology, who joined Uber last year. Waymo asked the court to issue a temporary injunction that could have halted Uber’s self-driving program.

      Get

      Talking Points

      in your inbox:

      An afternoon recap of the day’s most important business news, delivered weekdays.

      Thank you for signing up! Sign up for more newsletters here

      Over the past few months, both sides have traded barbs with one another and attempted various legal tactics to gain the upper hand. Waymo accused Levandowski of downloading thousands of documents and using the findings at Uber. Levandowski decided to plead the Fifth Amendment in the case, reserving the right against self-incrimination.

      In his ruling Monday, Judge William Alsup of US District Court in San Francisco, said, “Waymo LLC has shown compelling evidence that its former star engineer, Anthony Levandowski, downloaded more than 14,000 confidential files from Waymo immediately before leaving his employment there.”

      He added, “Significantly, the evidence indicates that, during the acquisition, Uber likely knew or at least should have known that Levandowski had taken and retained possession of Waymo’s confidential files.”

      Advertisement

      Alsup directed Uber to produce a timeline of the events leading up to Levandowski’s hiring, including all oral and written discussions between the two parties about a key self-driving technology called LiDar — short for light detection and ranging — which Levandowski has been accused of stealing. The judge also ordered Uber to do what it could to ensure the return of the files to Waymo, including the possibility of terminating Levandowski’s employment at Uber.

      “Competition should be fueled by innovation in the labs and on the roads, not through unlawful actions,” Johnny Luu, a Waymo spokesman, said in a statement. “We welcome the order to prohibit Uber’s use of stolen documents containing trade secrets developed by Waymo through years of research, and to formally bar Mr. Levandowski from working on the technology.”

      Despite the judge’s ruling on Levandowski, Uber also had cause for celebration as its self-driving research program was not required to be put on hold, a serious blow that could have put the company behind others in the race to bring autonomous vehicles to market.

      “We are pleased with the court’s ruling that Uber can continue building and utilizing all of its self-driving technology, including our innovation around LiDar,” Niki Christoff, an Uber spokeswoman, said in a statement.

      Alsup’s ruling follows his decision Thursday to refuse Uber’s request to send the case to arbitration. The case will now move to a public trial. Alsup had also referred the case to the US attorney’s office for possible theft of trade secrets, raising the possibility of criminal charges for those involved if the Department of Justice decides to take up the case.

      The ruling compounds a troubled few months for Uber, which is also grappling with allegations that its workplace is ridden with sexual harassment. Travis Kalanick, Uber’s chief executive, is also under scrutiny over his leadership. And the company is facing a Justice Department inquiry into “Greyball,” a tool that Uber used to deceive authorities worldwide.

      Driverless cars have become increasingly contentious among tech titans. For years, Google had an advantage as an early entrant into autonomous vehicle research. The company has made strides in improving the cars’ performance through rigorous road testing in the San Francisco Bay Area.

      But Google has faced increasing competition. Apple has ramped up autonomous research efforts, while Uber has poured millions of dollars into bringing self-driving cars to the mainstream as quickly as possible. Automakers including General Motors and Ford have also invested in artificial intelligence startups such as Cruise Automation and Argo AI in hopes of building the software that will run self-driving cars in the future.

      Uber has spent the past few weeks working to minimize the impact of a ruling from Alsup against Levandowski. In a memo to his staff in April, Levandowski said he was stepping back from making decisions on LiDar technology through the duration of the company’s legal proceedings.

      The ruling comes a day after Waymo confirmed it had struck a deal with Lyft, the ride-hailing startup and a rival of Uber’s, to bring autonomous vehicles to consumers using Lyft’s network. Waymo’s research and technology paired with Lyft’s customer base could pose a significant threat to Uber, which has acknowledged it is behind Waymo in self-driving research.

      Ousted FBI Director James Comey Spotted at Performance Of Hit Musical

      Just days after being fired by President Donald Trump , former FBI Director James Comey was spotted at a performance of Fun Home in Washington, D.C. over the weekend.

      In one of his first public appearances since the high-profile dismissal, Comey and his wife, Patrice Comey, attended a matinee performance of the award-winning musical during its national tour.

      Comey and his wife posed for a photo with the company of the show after the performance at the National Theater.

      Fun Home won the Tony Award for best new musical in 2015. The musical is a true story that revolves around the life of Alison Bechdel , a lesbian cartoonist, and features flashbacks to her childhood and reflections of her past in an attempt to understand her father’s suicide. Fun Home had the first all-female writing team to win the Tony Award for best original score.

      Trump fired Comey on May 9, citing his handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email sever as reason for his dismissal. However, Democrats — and some Republicans — have questioned Trump’s motives for firing Comey, since the former FBI director was also investigating whether the Trump campaign had colluded with Russian officials to help influence the 2016 U.S. election.

      Barbara Whitman, one of the show’s lead producers, told the New York Times that Comey and his wife had bought tickets a while ago, and that their daughter had inspired them to see it.

      “Their daughter saw the tour in Chicago and told them they had to see it,” Whitman told the Times . “They were wiping away the tears as they came backstage to meet the cast. He said something to the effect of it was the best thing they could have picked for their first outing.”

      Comey is not the only government official to go to the theater after enduring a public setback. Hillary Clinton has been spotted at a host of Broadway shows over the last several months since losing the 2016 election, including Sunset Boulevard and the final performance of The Color Purple.